We’re going to build monster roller coasters in your house using just a couple of simple materials. You might have heard how energy cannot be created or destroyed, but it can be transferred or transformed (if you haven’t that’s okay – you’ll pick it up while doing this activity).


Roller coasters are a prime example of energy transfer: You start at the top of a big hill at low speeds (high gravitational potential energy), then race down a slope at break-neck speed (potential transforming into kinetic) until you bottom out and enter a loop (highest kinetic energy, lowest potential energy). At the top of the loop, your speed slows (increasing your potential energy), but then you speed up again and you zoom near the bottom exit of the loop (increasing your kinetic energy), and you’re off again!


Here’s what you need:


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Comments

8 Responses to “Roller Coasters”

  1. what if you add water to the slide, to make a Water slide!!!!!

  2. Sherrella Rollins says:

    Cool thanks I will do it in the future

  3. Only in the name of ‘science’…

  4. Sophia Pitcher says:

    it seems that you ARE fond of breaking things, (or was that just a sound effect???) . . . 😉

  5. Terri Fioretti says:

    Wow! I LOVE THIS!!! Even know I don’t like real roller coasters!
    I’m Terri’s daughter and I cannot wait to start.
    Sense I am the oldest I guess I can go as high as I want. LOL

    Thank you so much I love your videos and tutorials ;D

    ()_()
    (0.0)
    ( ^ ^ )
    U-U

  6. Pam McKay says:

    This looks awesome. My dad and I are going to love this!!!!!!!!

  7. Janelle Connolly says:

    We had our roller coaster come down off a pretty high tree house. It was so fun to watch the kids adjust lawn chairs as the coaster came near the ground. Super fun, will continue playing with this in the back yard.

  8. Kelley Esseltine says:

    fun!!!